Miller’s “The Elusive Miss Ellison” deserving of Austen, Heyer comparisons

When a novel is garnering comparisons to those of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, it makes me take notice — sometimes the comparisons are justified, but sometimes they are not. When it comes to Carolyn Miller’s “The Elusive Miss Ellison,” those comparisons are completely on point. This novel set in the Regency era is a fun, refreshing read. Lavinia is an outspoken, feisty heroine with a big heart when it comes to those in need. She has no use for rules of society that are vapid and shallow, and little use for people who perpetuate their usage. The new earl of Hawkesbury, Nicholas, is a proud and self-centered man who has returned to the family seat in Gloucestershire. He has little patience for insipid husband hunters and their daughters. However, he finds himself inexplicably drawn to the one woman who wants nothing to do with him — Lavinia. Lavinia and Nicholas have a history that only is hinted at in the beginning of the novel, and it helps to create a believable tension between the two. Miller’s setting is described wonderfully, from the country setting to London itself. The novel is well-plotted and its events unfold with pitch-perfect timing throughout. The second book in the series is set to be released June 27 — and I can’t wait to read it. But “The Elusive Miss Ellison” definitely is a...

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